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Recent Work

 

Spring Meadow“Spring Meadow”
Oil on canvas, 22” x 28”

This is a sparkling celebration of spring and all its elements of simple beauty.  Reminiscent of river sailing in antique days, this is a painting that provokes the senses as one moves from the lazy river to walk through marshy grass and spring wild flowers.  Once you have surveyed the obvious, pick a point on which to focus and allow you consciousness to have the pleasure of creating an extended vista of what is beyond the picture.

Lavender Fields“Lavender Fields”
Oil on canvas, 22” x 28”

 Imagine sitting on an elevated patio overlooking rolling hills of lavender in the South of France.  Allow it to rush upon you as the aroma takes you into tranquil relaxation. Follow the walkway down the hill and up to the village on a hill.  Perhaps there will be a small café with fresh baked pastry. From this new perspective, look back from the village at where you have been.  Once you have exercised your mind in connecting all the parts of a composition put together this way, expanded imagination is really possible.  “ Ancient Blessings” Oil on Canvas, 28” x 22” In Tuscany there are many ancient buildings and splendid gardens that remind us of the multi-dimensional nature of our cultural heritage.  We can see beauty in nature along with the passing of time.  In this composition we are taken first into an upward assent through the rock stair casing and then given the opportunity of seeing from the top, only what our imagination can complete.

Grace Beyond Time“Grace Beyond Time”
Oil on canvas, 28” x 22”

 In this painting we have a similar combination of elements as in “Ancient Blessings,” stretching not only through space but also time.  There are nostalgic remnants of a fallen mansion and an antique garden, but then passing through the weathered archways of an old reality is a sunlit realm of uncharted possibility.

Paradise“Paradise”
Oil on canvas, 22” x 28”

This is a compilation of many sensory opportunities, including an expanded view beyond the picture plane out to a new sea of uncharted possibility.  The sunlight gives its own perspective through shadows, and winding shorelines offer an exercise to the mind to fill in with other perceptions along the way.

When Heaven Touches Earth-1“Where Heaven Touches Earth”
Oil on canvas, 22” x 30”

 This painting is a composite of more than spatial perspectives.  There are several reality combinations around a common theme.  The vines in the foreground of this painting are from my own vineyard in Paradise, Texas.  However, the total sentience of the vine and viticulture could only be expressed with vineyards from around the world (four to be exact) which make up the rest of the painting.  The way they are put together in a coherent reality, with the sky and earth converging over the hills is a launching point into spaces even beyond.

Sacred Hills“Sacred Hills”
Oil on canvas, 22” x 26”

This is not just a pictorial view.  It is the view outside the artist’s studio window in Sedona, where she has lived for years, carefully observing every shrub and meeting many of the rabbits living under them. Herds of javalina seek shelter here in the winter snows, and deer graze peacefully in the summer when cactus offers its rich fruit. Red-tailed hawks circle overhead and even an occasional bald eagle flies in for winter seasoning. Though it seems a desert, it is teeming with life.

Of the many seasons of beauty on these hills, the one chosen to commemorate most aptly describes high desert life–the summer monsoons. This is a time in July and August, when the heat of summer is canceled by sudden rains that usually come in the middle of the day. They drench the ground for about an hour and then move off, leaving the most wonderful refreshing aromas of sage, pine, and cedar, with clouds that form patchwork patterns across the sky, setting the stage for spectacular sunsets. The desert is a paradox, and this season most perfectly captures that quality when life is renewed at the height of its challenge to survive.

The Heart's Garden“The Heart’s Garden”
Oil on canvas, 22” x 28”

This painting explores multi-dimensional perspectives in an intimate setting. This is a real place in the Fort Worth Botanical Garden where Glenda spent many hours writing the original script for her best-selling book, “Love Without End.”  This was a place of visual, spiritual, and thought-filled immersion.  The bench was the center point of the rich panorama within this garden setting. The trees created a dynamic arbor to frame the flowers and pathway, as they filtered the ambient light around her.

Grandmother's Garden“Grandmother’s Garden”
Oil on Canvas, 30” x 22”

 This is the most impressionistic of all my recent paintings, not only in style and color, but also in motivation. I wanted to explore the richness of life and color through an even larger expanse of sensory stimulation.  Through my use of multiple perspectives I developed order that transcends chaos, and yet brings every impression vividly into focus.

 

For information on availability of original paintings  please contact one of our representatives.

Additionally, there are two 100-issue signed and numbered editions of Iris Giclee.  One edition is the same size as the original painting, and the other somewhat smaller.  For specific information on original paintings and Giclee editions please call our main office at 1-888-453-6324.

[*An Iris Giclee is the state of the art replication of paintings, which are created by the artist, issued one at a time, and are virtually indistinguishable from the original.  They can be created on rag paper or fine art canvas using vivid inks that are demonstrated to be stable for two hundred years or longer.  In the case of these paintings, only canvas giclees are available, because the image needs to be free from any reflections of glass, which would be necessary in the protection of paper.]

 

Banner 2000-2008

2000 to 2008 Classic Images

This was a period in which Glenda’s spiritual ideals and insights would be expressed more directly through writing, teaching, and public speaking, allowing her painting endeavors to resume their unique creative and poetic impetus as in years before.

There would be obvious continuity with the 90s through her use of spiritual imagery, such as angels, although now there would be a change of emphasis.  Rekindling her artistic orientation of the seventies and eighties she would select classic images of women that allow her to focus on composition, brushwork, meticulous rendering, and human sensibility of the sort that had served her so well in past decades.  However, after a decade of exploring the height and depth on human consciousness in the 90s, these new paintings would be even more sensitive and evocative than the ones before.  The contrasts would be more intense, the colors bolder, and the state of mind more contemplative.

There would be components of psychology, and most especially spatial organization, that could not have been achieved earlier.  At first glance this would seem to be a relatively conservative period focused on technical finesse, poetic feelings, and traditional subjects.  However, there were seeds of innovation that would spring forward into a whole new epoch in 2008.

By spending the previous decade largely disconnected from the material world, immersed in a larger field of consciousness, engaged in a sophisticated study of mind, Glenda was able to grasp and express our human aptitude for actually creating one’s perception of the spaces seemingly wrapped around us.   Similar beliefs were primary to the drive of the post impressionists painters, although science did not yet exist to confirm their devote expressions of both diverse and strangely discordant perspectives.

Glenda’s research and objective confirmation of it could be seen in two small landscapes of this period.  Though small in physical size, their power would launch new artistic creations once she had completed this important interval of reclaiming the artistic power and passion of past decades including her revolutionary theory of color developed in the sixties and seventies.

 

View: 2000-2008 Art Gallery